Learn about Canada’s Oil Sands – #QualityEssentials

This post was brought to you by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers via sheblogs. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not indicative of the opinions or positions of CAPP.

What if tomorrow oil wasn’t accessible anymore? The oil industry powers a lot of sectors around the world. We can agree that oil is used in multiple products that we use daily: gas, cosmetics, plastics, heating, etc. In fact, with our ever growing population, the demand for oil is also growing… it’s part of our daily lives. When I observe how oil plays a big part in my immediate surrounding, I can’t imagine what I’ll do if tomorrow morning, oil wasn’t accessible anymore.

Fresh Strawberries

Oil propels food production

I live in a little town surrounded by fields. Throughout the summer, you can observe different equipment used to work those fields. All that machinery is powered by oil. Without oil, we could certainly return and plow those fields by hand. But seeing the vastness of the work to be done, I doubt that we could finish the work before winter comes. Extra labor would result in higher cost of food.

Warm Home thanks to Oil Sands

Oil heats houses

My 1960’s house was built around a heating system that is powered by oil. It keeps my home warm. During winter, when I play outside with my kids, I don’t mind the cold too much. I know that I can rely on a warm house when we come back to enjoy our cup of hot chocolate.

Hot Shower - Oil Sands of Canada

Oil heats water

Less critical but quite so convenient, oil powers my water heater. I know for a fact that I can handle a cold shower once in a while. But I greatly appreciate the fact that I can add hot water to instantly produce a more enjoyable experience.

$3 DIY Charm Necklace Tutorial - thediydreamer.com

Oil gets me where I need to go

I live in a small town where we need to travel to where we need to go. My husband works 40km away, so he needs to drive to work everyday. The closest craft store is also 40km away (you know how important that is to me hehe). Again, I must drive there when I need supplies to create tutorials for you like the DIY Charm Necklace. We do however have a local grocery store and hardware store, so no need to travel to get there.

Oil Sands in Canada

Luckily, in Canada, we have one of the biggest oil reserves in the world. We are in fact the 6th largest producer of crude oil in the world! Plus we contain the 3rd largest oil reserves with 97% in the oil sands. Oh you didn’t know that? Well you aren’t alone. A market research study indicated that a lot of Canadians don’t know and don’t care much about the Oils Sands Industry. Isn’t that alarming, considering that we rely so much on petroleum?

So let’s get to know our Oil Sands together shall we. We’ve covered that Canada has the third largest oil reserves in the world and that 97% of those reserves in the Oil Sands. Oh but where are the Oil Sands? They are found in 3 deposits in Canada: The Athabasca, Peace River, and the Cold Lake areas in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Oil Sands is where Canada’s energy future lies. It’s a secure source to meet our growing oil demands PLUS it could generate 800,000 jobs within the next 25 years!! Isn’t that fabulous news?!

I’m so happy we got to learn more about Canada’s Oil Sands Industry together!

For more information about the Oil Sands industry visit oilsandstoday.ca

Have a FABULOUS day!
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This post was brought to you by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers via sheblogs. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not indicative of the opinions or positions of CAPP.

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9 thoughts on “Learn about Canada’s Oil Sands – #QualityEssentials

  1. I live in Texas, where there is tons of controversy about the oil sands and how they are going to use a pipeline to transport your oil sands to Texas to refineries. I live in the 4th largest city and most liberal city in Texas and there are tons of liberals who hate the idea of transporting your oil sands down here. While I think its a bit crazy to transport them to Texas, I think its great that this resource to use. Wouldn’t it be better for Canada and Canadian jobs if they could refine their own oil?

    I live less than 80 miles from the State’s second largest city – San Antonio and less than 200 miles from the largest city and the 4th largest in the U.S., Houston. Your oil sands are headed to the Houston area to the refineries. Believe me, we also need oil to get around Texas and to produce the electricity to cool our homes to make Texas a livable State.

    I find it hard to believe that so many Canadians don’t know about your oil sands – I don’t pay much attention to the news and I know it.

    • Hey Leah,

      Thanks for your question – and your support of industry!

      Your question about refining in Canada instead of shipping it to Texas is a good one. Growth in exports of Canadian oil through improved market access – no matter where the oil is processed – is good for North America because it creates significant economic benefits, including jobs.

      While new value-added upgrading is planned in Alberta and will generate economic activity and commensurate benefits, it is not without its challenges under current market conditions:

      - Currently the cost of new upgraders is higher than the price difference between heavy oil and light oil, meaning it costs more to build a new upgrader to take bitumen to light oil than the price difference between heavy and light oil.
      - There is significant construction job creation from new upgrading but we are also seeing a tight construction job market already in Alberta.
      - Petroleum products specifications are different in regional markets, meaning that gasoline created for Chicago cannot be sold in California, but oil can be sold in both markets.
      - Supplies of heavy oil imports from Mexico and Venezuela are declining, leading to higher demand for Canadian heavy oil in the U.S. market.
      - The extra cost of carbon in in Alberta that does not exist in other North American provinces or states adds cost to upgraders in Alberta.

      The oil and gas industry supports decisions regarding upgrading in Canada based on each projects economic merits and interest from investors.

      Hope that helps! Enjoy your day!
      Christina from CAPP

  2. I grew up in Alberta and have visited the Oil Sands. I agree that they are important and that we need to find ways to harvest that energy responsibly. :) Since my husband is currently job-hunting, all those extra jobs sound great too. It’s amazing how many things we need oil and gas for. :) Thanks for sharing!

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